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[11 Jun 2010 | 4 Comments | ]

“Chivalry is dead.” I’ve heard that a thousand times. I’ve said it myself. You’ve probably said it, too. But thinking about it, I’ve realized that what people generally mean is “Courtesy isn’t what it used to be.” That’s a statement I can agree with. But then I still read Emily Post’s “Blue Book”, wear hats, and know enough to take them off in elevators and in the presence of ladies (defined as any woman at least 14 years old who haven’t proven that they are not ladies). In any event, that is a discussion for another time.

Chivalry is not dead. It is my contention that wherever an individual is willing to put their life, their fortune or their sacred honor on the line for someone else, Chivalry lives.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | One Comment | ]

The York Rite Degrees of Freemasonry consist of several branches including The Royal Arch, Cryptic Rite and Knights Templar. This video, created by the Freemasons of Indiana explains the degrees in intricate detail.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | 2 Comments | ]

LARGE numbers of our members and, in fact, many of our Templar speakers, are still imbued with the fiction that modern Masonic Templarism has a direct connection with and is the lineal descendant of the Knights Templar Order, instituted in 1113 by Hugh DePayne to protect pilgrims on their journey to the Holy Land, and one often hears both publicly expressed and inferentially suggested that our present Grand Master holds his office in direct accession to the martyred Jacques de Molai, whom an avaricious king of France, with the concurrence of an infamous Pope of Rome, burned at the stake in Paris, March 18, 1313: this despite the fact that this pleasing fiction has been discarded by numbers of our prominent Masonic writers and historians during the last quarter of a century, Sir Knight Colman in his Centennial address to the Grand Encampment in 1916 upon the subject of the early history of that body, sa

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | One Comment | ]

The system of the Strict Observance grew out of what is known as Templarism. Templar Masonry commenced to grow up in France soon after true Freemasonry was introduced. This was about 1725. However, no Grand Lodge was established till 1752. It is not till then that we are on sure footing.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | One Comment | ]

On the Grand Standard of a Commandery of Knights Templar these words are inscribed over “a blood-red Passion Cross,” and they constitute in part the motto of the American branch of the Order. Their meaning, “By this sign thou shalt conquer,” is a substantial, but not literal, translation of the original Greek.

Modern Templars, Templar Mysteries »

[1 Apr 2010 | No Comment | ]

The mystic ladder pertains particularly to us as Knights Kadosh, as the type of our order. It is composed of two ascents or supports that remind us of the compact which took place between Philip the Fair and Pope Clement the V, and the strength of that union which was given against our predecessors. The reunion of the two ascents or supports, and the seven steps of which it is composed, give an exact idea of the seven conditions which Philip imposed on Beltian de Goth, when he was Archbishop of Bordeaux, to be seated in the chair of St. Peter, when he obligated him to participate in the destruction of the Knights Templars.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | No Comment | ]

Seven centuries and a half have passed away since, in 1118 eight French noblemen, uniting themselves into a society, became the Master and Brethren of the Temple. They first displayed the red cross upon the field in 1148; were almost annihilated in storming Ascalon in 1153; their principles were confirmed by the Bull Omne Datum Optimum, in 1139 and they fought the great battle of Tiberias in 1187, in which year the Holy City of Jerusalem surrendered to the Infidels.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | No Comment | ]

The regalia worn by the modern day Masonic Knights Templar is a harsh departure from that worn by the Templars of the middle ages. The sharpest contrast is in the amount of ornamentation on the sword. The Templar rule of order forbade any decoration on the Templar’s sword while a modern Templar sword is full of all sorts of carving, engraving and ornamentation.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | 25 Comments | ]

One of the most frequent questions we receive in our email box comes from people trying to learn about Templar swords that they have either purchased at estate sales or inherited from family members who were members of the order.

Modern Templars »

[1 Apr 2010 | No Comment | ]

Freemasonry has, since its formal inception with the uniting of four London based lodges in 1717, sought an answer for its roots in history. The speculations have been as varied as the Freemasons who have offered them. Among the speculations have been the Masons of Ancient Egypt, The Roman Building Guilds, Solomon’s workmen and a host of others.